Monday, July 17, 2017

Short Stories & Such 34: Marketplace

Back in April 2015, I attended the MT. SAC Science Fiction Workshop led by Scott Noon Creley (see http://scottcreley.com/) 
Creley had us write a science fiction setting for our world (good or bad). He wanted us to show and not tell using the 5 senses. In other words, he wanted the author to give a tour of the setting to the reader.
The following is my attempt. I only had one paragraph, but you can actually get an idea for a new story.

Marketplace

They came on the surfboards of the air, ear-splitting, and four-feet long crafts. They watched with glass eyes the people lined up against the red brick walls. Red from blood-stained entertainment.

Merchants wore their pointy hats- yellow and orange like the dry sky. Bellies full of food, they wobbled under their robes.

The foul smell of dust mixed with sweat permeated the narrow road, but they watched with glass eyes and metal hearts. Money purses dangled from their cold hands.

Dirt blew on the people’s faces. The bustling clinging of chains rattled behind them. Each of us holding a loved ones’ hands, teetering teeth and knees.

“Sold!” came the verdict.

“Dispose!” came the command.

“Turn around!” came another.

Those with metal hearts obeyed and pushed or clubbed or…

Our hands held tightly while the merchants passed us. The sweat from the outside rays were visible, and their flushed faces meant the day was done.

For some, it was a beginning. For others, it was a blessing. For those willing to live, it was utter agony ripping through our flesh-stricken hearts. 

Monday, July 10, 2017

Quote 26

“An animal’s eyes have the power to speak a great language.”
Martin Buber

During my wait at the vet’s office, I realized the longing some dogs have based on their eyes. Some want to play and run and meet everyone. Others, are too scared to be curious and may become aggressive. You can tell by looking at their eyes. The nervousness or the joy.
When the office staff called me up to make a payment, I left my dog with my sister. When I turned to walk back, I saw my dog’s eyes. They never left me, and as I got closer, those same honey eyes changed to a brighter hue- glad I was back, and expecting new scents, and wanting my attention (or reassurance). And this quote is true for any animal, especially those in need.

Since we’re on the topic of noticing animal’s eyes, here are a few places you may donate to or volunteer for:


Saturday, July 1, 2017

Independence Day Week

A lot of you have already gone on vacation and are enjoying yourself, others are preparing to celebrate July 4th this Tuesday. Hopefully, everyone has a safe event with family, pets, and friends. Speaking of pets, it’s important to keep them in a safe location when the fireworks go up and children should be supervised at all times. The following are some tips found on Rover.com, a pet sitting/dog boarding/dog walking online venue with lots of information for owners. Of course, the safest (and sanest) way to celebrate would be without any fireworks. It’s good for the environment, good for your pets, and good for you (no after the day clean-up).

p.s. you can also check out the links from @m_a_Arana on twitter

Also, I know this post is early, but I won’t be able to post it on Monday. Enjoy!





Monday, June 26, 2017

Writer’s Workshop 24: Poetry’s Important Motion

Here’s another post on my experience in the MT. SAC Writer’s Weekend, April 28, 2017. This time, the Poetry Workshop was led by wonderful Nikia Chaney. She works at the Inlandia Institute in Southern California and her website is www.nikiachaney.com

Chaney’s workshop included some information about poetry and a few prompts, to which she provided guidance and feedback on the work presented. She spoke of the importance of indirect meaning, sound, and imagery in poetry.
Indirect meaning is where poetry says a lot with minimal space and where poetry has metaphor, simile, and/or allusion.
Sound involves repetition (of a word, phrase, or beat), alliteration, assonance, and
rhythm (soft). The repetition should not ‘hit us over the head,’ but repeat enough times that the reader expects it.
Imagery involves sensory language.

Chaney also mentioned that there is no wrong way to start a prompt and to always try new things with poetry. “If you think you’re doing something wrong with it, it must be right. That’s your creativity. Enjoy the writing and have fun with it.”

For the first prompt, Chaney had us listen to Lucille Clifton’s “Cutting Greens,” which you can read AND listen to at https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/54590
Then, she asked us to write about something mundane that connects with life; a boring task like brushing teeth. Write what you do and replace some words with images and ideas similar to what Clifton did. Add details without censoring yourself.

The second prompt, she had us listen to Yusef Komunyakaa’s “Anodyne,” which you can read AND listen to at https://www.ibiblio.org/ipa/poems/komunyakaa/anodyne.php

Then, she asked us to write one line you can repeat but break up in different ways four times within your poem. To do this, you need to change the line a little, but still let us recognize it for the rhythm (like music). For example, “I want everything” can be added throughout your poem in different ways such as “You can give me” or “I want everything” and “everything you can” or “give me” and “I want you” and each one is on a different stanza.

Try writing some poems and see what you come up with... very interesting stuff =)

Monday, June 19, 2017

Books I’m Reading 32

Cure Back Pain: 80 Personalized Easy Exercises for Spinal Training to Improve Posture, Eliminate Tension & Reduce Stress by Jean-Fran├žois Harvey, BSc, DO. There’s a self-assessment and many exercise routines targeting the various muscles that help prevent back pain.

The Dogist: Photographic Encounters with 1,000 Dogs by Elias Weiss Friedman. This is a great compilation of different dog breeds that would put a smile on any dog enthusiast.

The Dark Tower: The Drawing of the Three by Stephen King, adapted by Peter David as a graphic novel titled The Lady of the Shadows for Marvel. This story looks back at Odetta’s childhood and her multiple personality disorder before she lost her legs and got taken to Mid-World in search of the Dark Tower with the Gunslinger.


97 Ways to Make a Cat Like You by Carol Kaufmann. This pocket-sized book is filled with facts and tips about taking care of your cat.

Monday, June 12, 2017

Pet News 25: Time for Puppy Pays off

This is the time of year for babies and puppies, and everything about growing.
Here, I’ll be focusing on puppies and providing a few basic tips I've used on all my dogs.

Puppies need a lot of attention and monitoring. Scheduling play, feeding, relieving, and training. It’s good to brush up on First Aid for pets. Also, read more about the breed you selected to be part of your family. Of course, researching a breed should be done prior to bringing them home. Too often, guardians select a mismatched breed and when puppies reach their ninth month, it’s harder to find a home, unless they’re in a no-kill shelter (which should be something we strive toward having, but I digress…)

Play is important in a puppy’s social upbringing. Not only does it encourage good behavior, it allows them to trust their new family. After being removed from their mother’s care, a puppy needs to know they are cared for and loved. Playing with them helps reassure teamwork, leadership, and fun. They also come to rely on you to feed them. In the beginning, puppies get fed about four times a day. Small portions to allow for bowel movements. This way, you can teach the puppy where to relieve themselves about ten to twenty minutes after feeding. Note that after a long play session. puppies should relieve themselves, too.

The basics for training your puppy are Sit, Stay, Watch, and Come. These are the ones I used when I got my puppy (who was already six months old, yikes!). You can always add other commands as your puppy matures or learns the basic ones.

With treat in hand, ask the puppy to sit without saying command. Lure their nose up, and their behind usually comes to a sit. Praise and give treat. If not, gently tap the rear. Do this multiple times. Then, add the word Sit, wait, praise, treat. Repeat until you no longer need the treat.

To get the puppy to Stay, ask puppy to Sit, then to Watch you. When you see they are watching you, praise and treat. Repeat. Then, say Stay and back up one step. If your puppy stays, move forward, praise and treat. Repeat until you can take multiple steps back. Then, repeat until you no longer need treat.

To get the puppy to Come, have the puppy Sit, Stay, and back away. Call puppy to you and praise when they reach you. Provide a treat. You can tether the puppy so as not to allow them to run away or to ensure they stay within the perimeters of the training session. You can add distance as the puppy gets better at coming. You can also do it sitting down. Later, you can add distractions, like give the puppy a ball, then call them to you.

Training sessions should be short and quick at first. Once the puppy gets better, trainings could be longer as their attention has gotten better.


Remember: Praise and Treat and Play afterwards. Also, pet slowly and softly, below chin, shoulders, chest. Practice touching paws for nail trimming and massage teeth, gums for brushing in future. Good luck!

Monday, June 5, 2017

Art 19: Sitting Pensive



The pose above was one I drew when I attended some Life Drawing workshops in 2011 (I know, quite a long time ago).
The model posed for ten minutes and I focused on the neck, jaw and shoulder area of the model. The trick I found that worked was to angle the lines to guide me where each body part would go, then, freely draw the body. Once that was down, which is like a skeleton, you start focusing on the areas to darken to build on the lines drawn.

Ten minutes wasn’t enough time to continue the rest of the body, but you could always finish the drawing from memory at a later time. I had been practicing drawing for a couple of days by now, and you could tell it paid off in this drawing. I liked the way it came out and would rather see it incomplete. I hope you do, too =)